Golden Motor 500 Watt BLDC Non hub question???

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rocket
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Joined: 03/26/2011
Points: 14

Hi,

Newbe here, I have this motor and want to run a 48V 1000 Watt or 48V 1500 Watt controller with hall sensor and I'm not sure which way to go? Also both of the controllers have a hall sensor in them but so does the motor so its a 3 part question.

1. Is over volting to 1000 or 1500 watt to much for this motor?

2. If there is a hall sensor in the motor can you also have a hall sensor on the controller?

3. What could happen with the 2 questions above?

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Brad

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larrydam
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Joined: 11/01/2007
Points: 16
Re: Golden Motor 500 Watt BLDC Non hub question???

under normal riding conditions with hills that aren't too steep and long, going with 48 v is ok. the key here is to keep your speed up on hills and check your motor's temperature.

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Heman B.
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Joined: 05/18/2012
Points: 102
Re: Golden Motor 500 Watt BLDC Non hub question???

wattage has very little to do with the engine.
If the engine is a 700W engine, it most likely can absorb 2000W peak.
You can only overvolt it. You will notice overvolting after a while overheats the engine. If the engine becomes so hot you can't put your hand on it, you're overvolting it.
The amps do nothing to damage to the engine. In fact, more amps is better. If you connect more batteries in series, would result in more torq.
Usually when connecting a single 48V 20A battery to the engine, the battery can't sustain maximum torq.
Providing all the amps the engine can eat, only causes it to take in as much as it can, no more.

Like a waterhose can only take in a certain amount of water within itself.

Overvolting is dangerous, is like changing the speed a of water inside the hose by increasing the pressure. Increase it too much,and the hose will burst. The hose being your engine (or more importantly, the more sensitive controller).

Overvolting also can cause the fuses to pop, and the on-board electronics to break.

MEroller
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Joined: 09/26/2011
Points: 663
Re: Golden Motor 500 Watt BLDC Non hub question???

Nope, it is current that heats up a motor, and current that pops a fuse. Voltage is only the driving force, or pressure, but heating and torque are both caused by the current which the voltage can get going while overcoming ohm resistance and inductance.

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Heman B.
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Joined: 05/18/2012
Points: 102
Re: Golden Motor 500 Watt BLDC Non hub question???

voltage and current are intertwined.
The current of a machine usually you can't change,as a 700W motor will only take so much current.
The voltage you can.
Increasing the voltage, will increase the current, as the resistance of the motor remains the same.
U=I*R

Plug a 12V battery, 5 Amps to a 12V 30Watt motor, and it will work.
Plug 3 12V batteries, 5 amps each in parallel to a 30W motor,and you'll notice very little change.
Plug 2 12V batteries 5 amps each, in series with the 30W motor, and the motor will go out of control, rotating (theoretically) at twice the speed!

Plug a 12V 5A battery to a 12V 700W motor, under load, and the motor will not function very well.
Plug 10x 12V 5A batteries in parallel to a 12V 700W motor and the motor will function optimally
Plug 20x 12V 5A batteries in parallel to a 12V 700W motor and the motor will function just like above, with the only difference that it's able to run twice as long.
Even if you'd run the motor at 24V, 5A/battery, it will not function optimally as it does not receive enough amps from the battery to perform it's duty.

Amps is like water in a pipe. There's only so much going through to the machine. Voltage would be like waves (if they ever existed in a pipe) or pressure.
the higher the waves (the more pressure), the more excited the water is, the more effective the machine will be working.
Higher pressure automatically means if someone opens a tap, that there will be more water flowing through it
(hmm.. voltage is very difficult to explain in terms of water and pipes).

Heman B.
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Joined: 05/18/2012
Points: 102
Re: Golden Motor 500 Watt BLDC Non hub question???

concerning fuses yes, the amps overheat a fuse,as they can break an engine too, but the amps are dependent upon the voltage.
If the resistance remains the same the voltage needs to go higher.
If the voltage remains the same,then the resistance needs to go lower (eg: short circuit).

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