Results - Converting SLA to Lithium 40ah

6 replies [Last post]
NoGas4Me2
Offline
Joined: 09/27/2013
Points: 30

Recently converted my 2008 brushed motor model EVT-4000e from spent SLA's to lithiums with excellent results! Thanks to a slightly higher pack voltage and straight across discharge profile, the scooter has much more power and keeps that power over the entire discharge cycle. Have not checked it with GPS but the speedometer says I picked up roughly 10 mph top end and range has almost doubled as well. The conversion included a 40ah 16-cell pack, a full BMS system, intelligent charger, over/under power relay shutdown and a 2-1/2 inch LED pack status monitor on the dash. To top it all off I converted the headlight, all turn signals and the taillight to low-power LED bulbs. When this was done, I removed the tacky front and rear turn signals (that always seemed to get knocked off) and used the internal front and rear turn signal housings. The result was much lower power drain and a cleaner look. Lastly, the scooter weight dropped by 90 pounds. Purchased the pack, BMS computer and a DC to DC converter from Elite Power Solutions in Phoenix. The LED bulbs & small display were purchased on eBay. Except for that display on the scooter console, it all looks pretty much standard. However, the performance improvement is nothing short of awesome! Next on my list are two new Michelin S1 tires and then I'll have a completely new scooter! Not posting complete details of the conversion since it appears no one is riding this scooter anymore. However, the pictures below pretty much chronicle the conversion process. If anyone has questions, feel free to contact me. Happy riding!

EVT-4000e After

Cell install

install 2

BMS Computer

Shunt

Battery Status Display

New Headlight & Testing Turn Signals

Clean Look w/o Tack-on Turn Signals

__________________

VP

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
phase_boy
Offline
Joined: 04/24/2012
Points: 12
Re: Results - Converting SLA to Lithium 40ah

Hi!

I am still riding this scooter, and I love it! I bought my used 2010 4000e in the summer of 2012, and I've ridden it a lot the last two summers. However, the 40Ah lithium manganese pack is now really showing its age, with a range reduced from about 55 KMs to 18-20 KMs.

All summer I was looking into new lithium battery options, but the cost is astronomical.

Would you share what it cost for the battery conversion?

And what type of lithium battery did you buy?

Here in Montreal, Canada, there are exactly zero places to have the scooter serviced. So when the scooter blew an 80 amp fuse the day I bought it, it took me a while to find the shrink-wrapped fuse in a heavy-gauge wire inside one of the two battery boxes. Later last year I also changed the rear tire. And this year I changed the four brake pads (after much research about the type of pads needed). I still need to replace a broken speedometer cable.

Anyhow, congratulations on a successful conversion! I would love to know more about it for when I attempt the same next spring.

Thanks,

Sylvan

NoGas4Me2
Offline
Joined: 09/27/2013
Points: 30
Re: Results - Converting SLA to Lithium 40ah

Sylvan

Yes, I am very happy with the results of this conversion. As I mentioned, it was done on a 2008 SLA model currently with about a 1,100 miles on it that I got off eBay brand new for $800 as a close-out in 2009. Except for the batteries, the rest of the scooter is in excellent condition though I just ordered 2 Michelin 100/80-10 S1's due to age. When planning the project, I was initially going to try to do it less expensively sourcing my cells and BMS separately. However, when I discovered the sweet turn-key packages at Elite Power Solutions in Phoenix, Arizona that plan changed. As someone who has never done a lithium conversion but is handy with a "multimeter", Elite's "handholding" was invaluable! I chose their 48v 40 Ah non-CAM package for US$1,649.00 ($50 less since I didn't need that large LED monitor).

48V 40aH Package

A 60 Ah pack would've been awesome but I couldn't figure out a way to fit the larger packs into the EVT-4000e frame without eliminating the under seat storage and I wanted to put the charger there (not to mention saving the extra $500!). As you can see, the four 40 Ah packs fit perfectly with the alternating vertical/horizontal stacking I used. The people at Elite were awesome and their "how to do it" wiring diagram (online) helped allot too. The only additions to their package were: 1) 48V-12V DC-DC converter to power the BMS computer and LED screen $15 & 2) a BMS balancing card cable extension $15 from Elite, 3) 12V relay for the low pack voltage cutout circuit, 4) 2-1/2" LED screen $15, 5) a $5 master on-off switch & recycled Anderson charging connector under the seat

Master Sw

and 6) some miscellaneous crimp connectors & heat shrink cable insulation. I reused some of the old Anderson connectors & red/black 12V 6 gauge cables. The LED bulbs were about $60 total off eBay & Super Bright LED bulbs, and they reduced the "just sitting there" current draw from over 6 amps to about .5 amps for the tail light/headlight combo. The tail light is one of those 3 blink types when the brakes are first applied and I loved being able to eliminate those tacked on turn signals. The charger is intelligent and it "talks" to the BMS computer while monitoring & topping off the pack until it is full as well as balanced. The cells are advertised as being 2000 cycle capable but that would be with full discharge cycles so for less than full cycles, I expect them to last a very long time. Again, not a cheap project but the results are far better than the OEM SLA scooter ever was - by a LARGE margin! Sylvan, when you are ready to do "it" feel free to contact/PM me for some tips (things like where I put the new DC-DC converter, how I wired in the low voltage relay to interrupt scooter power before the pack goes too far down...). Bravo Electric Vehicles shows dealers throughout the US including this one in Arizona. Perhaps you can find one just across the border from you? With 53V, 40 mph (65 kph) bursts are easily attainable as is a 40-50 mile range, though not at the same time ;) It's fun having a "new" scooter!

PS - Be sure to check out the clickable links above!

__________________

VP

Electric tony
Offline
Joined: 09/09/2014
Points: 23
Re: Results - Converting SLA to Lithium 40ah

Hey Icould use some advice. I recently bought a 60volt 25ah Iithium battery pack, to my surprise as soon as I hit the throttle..... The bike dies :(
My question is: does a 25ah (lithium) pack carry enough power to effectively run my evt 168? Is there anything I need to do in order to make this pack work? or do I need to up the ah?

Please help a nobody out,!

NoGas4Me2
Offline
Joined: 09/27/2013
Points: 30
Re: your problems with scoot dying

I used a 48V 40 aH 16 cell pack. Fully charged voltage of my pack is 53-54 volts. This remains fairly constant throughout the discharge profile until the EMS trips the auto shutdown relay at full pack discharge, which is really about 20% of actual pack capacity remaining. Unlike SLAs, Lithium's are never run down to actual 0% remaining as doing so would brick the pack. That you have a 25 aH vs 40 aH pack should not cause a problem. This would only reduce your range and it would not cause a problem with the controller. I recall someone using a 12.5 aH 48V bicycle pack to test their system and it worked perfectly for a very short distance. However, voltage is a different issue and I believe that is where your problem lies. If your 168 controller is the same as was used in my EVT, It was designed for 48V. Try fully charging your pack and then checking the voltage. The controller on my EVT was designed for 48V and if the pack is too much above that, it would not be able to handle the extra volts. Depending on what type of EMS controller you are using, it might also be shutting down the scooter if you wired in an auto shut down high voltage relay. My EMS is set up for 48V. If it were to see 60V (max spec voltage is 58.2), I would expect it to trip the auto shutdown circuit to protect the scooter controller and motor. Both UV and OV alarm outputs from the EMS are wired into relays that trip my scooters off switch (see #23, page 26 of this Elite Power Solutions manual), so if either condition occurs the effect is that my scooter completely shuts down. And that is exactly how it should work since the EMS is protecting the pack against permanent damage on both the low capacity and high voltage sides. If on the other hand you did not wire in an EMS or protection circuit and simply plugged in a 60V pack to the scooter controller (actual voltage probably being even higher), I do not know how the scooter controller would handle that much juice. Probably not very well, if at all.

I hope this helps you.

__________________

VP

Johnny J
Johnny J's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/08/2008
Points: 377
Re: your problems with scoot dying

The voltage is no problem for the EVT, I have tried the controller on 75V without problems.
You didn't say if there is a BMS on the battery pack?
If there is, it can be this that shuts down the power since the EVT draws more current than it can deliver.
Could also be a bad (or unbalanced) battery pack with weak cells that under load gets a severe voltage drop that either triggers the LVC of the BMS? or controller.

titine360
Offline
Joined: 02/01/2009
Points: 38
Re: Results - Converting SLA to Lithium 40ah

hello,
I look for someone who could give me the exact size of the battery tray inside for evt original 4000th brush motors?
I must make a new battery pack li-ion 23S / 30P
90A 94 volts!
thank you
Laurent

ps: a memory down what size?
after for the other 3? the one next to the other?

__________________

SOSSON

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

style="display:block"
data-ad-client="ca-pub-2401070691062219"
data-ad-slot="2079401426"
data-ad-format="auto">

Free guide to electric car charging extension cords We sometimes need to lengthen the charging cord, and need to know how to do so safely.



Who's new

  • msb
  • WV BIKER
  • weedytj
  • vivitern
  • flywithme

Customize This