Diagnosing problems with a multimeter

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Nicom
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Joined: 09/29/2011
Points: 21

Is someone available to show me how to identify witch components of my e bike are not functioning properly with a multimeter.

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colin9876
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Joined: 10/23/2008
Points: 289
Re: Diagnosing problems with a multimeter

Step1.
Turn the multimeter to the 20V setting.
Put the probes on each of the battery cells.
Post the readings back here!

Nicom
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Joined: 09/29/2011
Points: 21
Re: Diagnosing problems with a multimeter

Ok I am pretty sure it’s not the batteries. My Nicom batteries box is kind of taped together so I don’t want to take it apart, I am 99% sure it’s not a batteries issue. But I took a reading with my meter on 200v and the reading was 53.1V

Here is a little bit more information, I had left my bike outside during a wind/rain storm and decided to wrap my bike with a tarp (maybe a little too tightly I think some condensation formed inside the tarp). When I woke up the next morning the bike had fallen over. After connecting the battery everything was as normal. When the throttle was applied it did not translate into wheal movement, but instead the speedometer needle reflected the throttles input.

So I don’t think it is the battery…. It could be either the controller or the throttle assembly?

But I am with you what do we do next!

Nicom
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Joined: 09/29/2011
Points: 21
Re: Diagnosing problems with a multimeter

I decided to open the battery box ;) and I got 13 and quarter volts for each of the for batteries.

I have also been poking around the controler with my ohmmeter and every thing seems to be working in order. The only wire conected to the circut showing any resistence had an 8ohm resistor attached to it so I would guess that is normal?

Do you have anymore advice.. :)

robert93
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Joined: 08/13/2009
Points: 240
Re: Diagnosing problems with a multimeter

check the "motor interrupt" functions of the brake levers. If the levers are preessed, or think they are, you wont get any motor function.

Nicom
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Joined: 09/29/2011
Points: 21
Re: Diagnosing problems with a multimeter

Is that conected to the diode that operates the brake light?

robert93
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Joined: 08/13/2009
Points: 240
Re: Diagnosing problems with a multimeter

Think "simple", the brake levers, or at least one of them, has a small switch in it that is activated by the grasping of the lever and pulling it. When that happens, the switch position changes. If your brake lever was damaged by a fall, it is possible the bike may "think" the brake is on, and not allow the motor to run.

Nicom
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Joined: 09/29/2011
Points: 21
Re: Diagnosing problems with a multimeter

I ! like your thinking..! It jus so happens that the left hand brake lever is 3 16th of an inch from center and it just so happens that that is the side it fell on. I also droped my bike the first day and broke the same lever and had to go and get a replacment, I think that is why I havn't thought of that ;)

I will let you know what the outcome is....

:)

Nicom
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Joined: 09/29/2011
Points: 21
Re: Diagnosing problems with a multimeter

It didn't work.... :(

robert93
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Joined: 08/13/2009
Points: 240
Re: Diagnosing problems with a multimeter

Ok, by "it didnt work" I guess you are saying the switch is still working normally. Thats ok, at least we know one important safety feature works. Search the forum for testing the throttle. There are some good threads on this. Another idea is to start at the motor, and follow the wires to the controller. There should be two different types- 3 large wires, and some smaller ones. Make sure there is no burn spots, or insulation missing, and that all connectors are nice and tight. If the wires come out the same side as was face down when the scooter fell, they may have been damaged. Its also possible that the rain brought out a problem the previous owner had been experiencing.

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