Wondering if someone could start a wiki page on how to build a high end e-bike

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DanCar
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Wondering if someone could start a wiki page on how to build a high end e-bike

Anyone want to start one? I'm starting to build interest in building a high end e-bike. Can I suggest using a site such as wikibooks: http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Main_Page
Perhaps here is a place to start a chapter: http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Bicycles/Modifications
If someone starts one I will add content to it, such as cost of options for batteries.

Thanks,
Daniel

Sturdly
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What is your definition of high end ?

Good idea but........ there are so many options and types.

What do you mean by high end? Expensive electrics or an expensive donor bike, or both?

I've started a blog here to track my experiences with a BB drive type kit on a bike that sold for about a grand new in 2000. Add the kit and it will be around 2 grand worth of parts, bike and accessories. It won't be an Optibike or even close but should outshine a Suede E at about the same price.

The bike I got for free when I bought my car so I'll actually be into it about a grand in total out of pocket cash.

Does that qualify as high end?

Or were you thinking more of something that has a few thousand in motor and batteries alone?

Then again there was a time and not that long ago when a go hub would have been out of reach for me.

Please elaborate on an excellent concept.

DanCar
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By high end I was thinking a

By high end I was thinking a fast bike on the cheap.   I know that isn't going to happen.   How much is a 72V system going to cost with good batteries using a costco bike?   How fast does a BB drive kit go? Can you give a link?   Can we put Altairnano batteries on it? Or how about EEStor capacitor? Just kidding. We can dream now can't we. :-)

Sturdly
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That's what Ithought

A couple of links to bottom bracket drive:
http://elationebikes.com.au
http://epacpower.com.au
http://cyclone-usa.com

More a turtle than the hare you are thinking of. These keep your bicycle basically... a bicycle, but add power to your pedaling. Small wattage running through the crankset and all the gears. Except maybe the dual motor ZVO monster.

For my money I prefer the safety of a higher end bike. Good rims, headset, higher end derailers, disc brakes and the like. I want to be able to stop reliably and at the speeds reached by some of those huge hub motors and giant voltage batteries wouldn't really trust a cheap donor bike.

You see I don't care for road rash or falling down in general. I'm already missing some internal body parts and have run out of some spares. Plus the health insurance I carry will not cover accidents on anything not classified as a bicycle. Some of these big power rigs are borderline in that regard.

Good luck finding a partner , I'll be watching and looking forward to reading about the project.

DanCar
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I heard that a $100 steel

I heard that a $100 steel bike is safer then the light expensive bikes. http://www.electricrider.com/crystalyte/phoenix.htm
Notice the tip section on the left:
TIP: While bicyclists pay big money for a frame that is 2 pounds lighter, turns out the cheapest frames make the best electric bikes. Two pounds doesn't matter much when you're putting 50+ pounds of power plant on it. Take advantage of this. Our bike, even with Bulldog brakes cost less than $110...

So a cheap bike with good brakes looks like a winning combination.

Sturdly
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That may be so, however

For the weight addition and torque of big hub motors and mondo batteries that may be true. Both add substantially more stress to the bike and aluminum is not forgiving.

The power unit I am adding weighs in at about 18 pounds total including battery pack and will not be torquing the forks or rear triangle.

I lost 20 pounds myself this last summer in preparation for this conversion so I'm at minus 2 pounds from before the power kit.

Before kit was bike 38 pounds + me at 195 pounds = 233 total

After kit will be bike 56 pounds + me at 175 pounds = 231 total

My guess is that my handling and braking with dual discs will be better than a steel bike with rim brakes at say 40 pounds + power kit 50 pounds + me at 175 pounds =265 pounds.

About a 13% weight advantage for my version should = more nimble handling, and quicker stopping plus reduced wear / brake part replacement.

Acceleration and top speed go hands down to the high wattage hub motor.

Range and ability to pump it home easier in case of malfunction go to the lower weight bike, battery size being equal.

But that's one thing that makes this a challenging and fun hobby, so many choices. Tough sometimes to match the type of unit with the intended application.

I'm trying to have optimal hill climbing assist. If I lived in a flat area a hub motor would be my first choice.

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