EV Global 24-volt Ebike Problem

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roverrob
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Joined: 03/12/2011
Points: 11

I just picked up a 24-volt EVG ebike that was missing the battery pack and charger (of course). I put together my own battery pack using 2 12-volt 12-ah SLA batteries and wired it directly to the ebike leads without going through the stock battery connection block. The voltage from the pack is reading 26.2 volts. When hooked up to the bike, the lights and horn work, but it beeps and the red light flashes indicating a low battery level. The hub motor, which I know is good, does not activate. Am I missing something here or is there something else not working properly - like the controller? Shouldn't 26.2 volts be sufficient to register a full charge? Help!

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nyy0604
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Joined: 03/19/2011
Points: 7
Re: EV Global 24-volt Ebike Problem

The light and controller system are 2 system. The light work does not mean the controller system is right. In your case Check the controler power wire(black and red on the cotroller) to see if there have 26V power too? If no, Check the wire from battery to controller. If yes,I doubt your battery. What does your power meter say? say nothing or full and drop quick after you try to turn the throttle? One more question? Does your bike original 24V? information available at controller print.

roverrob
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Joined: 03/12/2011
Points: 11
Re: EV Global 24-volt Ebike Problem

Thanks for the reply. I checked the voltage at the two bigger wires running from the controller to the motor and it read "0" with the switch on and whether I activated the thumb throttle or not. The power meter reads "empty" (red light flashing) even though there is 26 volts going from the battery pack to the controller. Yes, this is the original 24-volt controller on this bike. Any other ideas?

dcmotorworks
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Joined: 04/30/2011
Points: 7
Re: EV Global 24-volt Ebike Problem

As i recall, a properly functioning controller lets out a series of beeps when power is connected and then, when the power switch is turned on, it will cycle through the led power lights and also gives off another series of diagnostic beeps.

The service manual (as a pdf file) is floating around the internet and describes the diagnostic beep codes. it was linked here http://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=22220&start=30 at the time of this posting.

the only simple problem I can think of at the moment:

Stuck throttle. if you turn on the power while the throttle is even slightly on the bike will go into a safety shut down mode and not work at all. seems like there was a flashing light on the power indicator when that happened. not sure which light flashed tho.

roverrob
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Joined: 03/12/2011
Points: 11
Re: EV Global 24-volt Ebike Problem

As it turns out, my EVG ebike was originally a 24-volt model that has been converted to 36 volts. That is why it was telling me that 24 volts was an insufficient charge. The Heinzmann hub motor is the 400 watt 24-volt unit, but, after switching to a 36-volt battery, everything is working fine.
Now I have another question for those who know ebikes better than I do. I have another EVG ebike with a problem. This is a 36-volt LE model. I'm pretty sure that the Heinzmann hub motor is shot. When I install the 36-volt battery, turn on the power and push the thumb throttle, the rear wheel turns, but it makes a terrible grinding noise. Also, if I try to pedal the bike without the motor assist, the front sprocket and chain rotate, but the rear wheel does not. What I am wondering is if I can install another brand 36-volt rear hub motor and use the existing EVG 36-volt controller. Can I just splice the wires from the replacement motor to the wires that now go to the Heinzmann motor? I'd like to be able to keep all of the EVG features like the lights and cruise control. Would I need to use another motor rated at 500 watts to do this, or does it not matter? Thanks for any help.

dcmotorworks
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Joined: 04/30/2011
Points: 7
Re: EV Global 24-volt Ebike Problem

I have never had a problem w/ one of my Heinzmann motors so I haven't pulled one apart yet. from what I understand, they use a steel internal gear system which is pretty bullet-proof. The heinzmanns are brushed motors so finding a (non heinzmann) replacement hub motor could be a problem as the other manufacturers I am aware of all produce brush-less motors now days which will not work w/ your EVG controller. the 36v 500w brushed heinzmann motors are hard to find but from my experience (and from yours i guess on your other bike) the 24v 400w seem to work just fine at 36v. Heck, the two Ultra Motor Europa's I looked at just had the 24v heinzmann hubs running at 36v on them.

That being said tho, it doesn't sound like it is necessarily a motor problem. If I understand you correctly, when you peddle the bike, peddle force isn't being transferred to the rear wheel? I am thinking that the free wheel in your gear cluster is shot? If so, the gear clusters are the standard clock-wise screw-on style common to most multi-speed bikes and just screw onto the housing of the hub motor. I replaced the one on my 36v E-bike w/ a higher gear ratio 7 -speed so I could peddle a bit faster. I know I had to drill out the center opening in a gear removal tool so it would slide over the axle on one of my brush-less motors but I think that the axle on my 36v Heinzmann was small enough that an unmodified tool just slid on. there are a few different spline sizes tho so if you are going to buy a tool, bring the wheel so you can match it up.

rockyromero
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Joined: 08/12/2009
Points: 18
Re: EV Global 24-volt Ebike Problem

I have a Europa ebike with the Heinzmann motor. I've had this for a year and the bike is solid. The battery is losing charge, even after full charging it overnight, and I would like to replace the battery with something that would give me greater capacity. The battery case is compact so that I would have to work with that limitation.

I've thought that LiPo batteries may be the next level for this.

Any thoughts on what would work for this? And how I could go about getting a better range and longer charge?

jthmi
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Joined: 02/12/2010
Points: 38
Re: EV Global 24-volt Ebike Problem

According to some of the folks at Ultramotor, the Heinzmann's spec'd on the Europas are good up to 48V. They are badged 24V 400W for some customs or similar situation at the point of manufacturing (China.) Your diagnosis on the freewheel failure may be spot on. We also stock the 11T freewheels for increased top end as the chainrings are not interchangeable without changing the crankarms as well.

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jthmi
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Joined: 02/12/2010
Points: 38
Re: EV Global 24-volt Ebike Problem

As recently as today we are continuing our work on a replacement Lion pack for the 36V Europa. The pack will use your orignal charger as well. There is probably going to be some modification required to the battery connection. The new pack fits but there still are some details to be worked out. We plan on doing some accurate runouts before we offer this solution at retail. Contact me offlist if you care to: sales@ampbros.com We currently have the latest version of the OEM pack available with a one year warranty.

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dcmotorworks
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Joined: 04/30/2011
Points: 7
Re: EV Global 24-volt Ebike Problem

I think the Europa's originally used a Lithium-polymer pack inside the plastic battery case? The one I saw anyways had a li-poly battery pack which was considerably smaller than the interior case dimensions and a spacer was used to keep the battery secure. At one point I was planning on upgrading one of my 36v EV Global E-bike's battery cases (same size/shape as the Europa's I believe, with a slightly different power connector at the bottom) with 12 12AmpHour Lifepo4 Headway cells. My calculations showed that 12 12AH screw-top headway cells would just fit inside the case with 2 stacks in this type of configuration:

But as I am not 100% certain that the EVG and the Europa battery cases are exactly the same size you should measure your case and make sure it will work if you want to go this route.

The top portion of the EVG battery pack had an internal (SLA) charger which I was going to remove and replace with the battery management system and use the case's original power plug to plug in an external charger.

I actually ended up switching to a 48V motor, a different controller, ditching the plastic battery case altogether and stuffing 16 12AH headway cells inside the EV global E-bike's battery compartment to power the 48v system. They all fit with like 1 mm to spare.

I made some studs by cutting the heads off of bolts so I could screw 2 cells together; positive to negative (like 2 batteries inside a flashlight? - I can't think of a better way to explain it) in order to reduce the over-all length of the battery pack and give it a bit more rigidity. I attached the negative leads of the BMS to eyelets around the studs between the two cells. Pretty sure I had decided I would have to do this to make the 12AH cells fit into the EVG battery case for the 36v pack. The 12AH Headway cells (including screws) are listed as 155 mm in length and the case's interior battery compartment length is about 310mm so it may have just fit but something durable and non-conductive would have had to go between the 2 banks of six cells. Anyways, using the studs instead of the screws and connectors shortened the pack by about a centimeter.

DC

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