Prius - The Next Generation

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uriel8
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Prius - The Next Generation

The first one went down to the street back in 1997 when Diana died and Microsoft bought a $150 million share of financially troubled Apple Computer. It turned a corner towards the current model in 2004, and the next generation of Toyota Prius was supposed to roll down the road in 2008 and achieve 94 mpg. We might have to try 2009/2010 on that but it IS coming. Toyota assures of that that fact. Look out Detroit!

Prius - The Next Generation

Efried
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Re: Prius - The Next Generation

Hi,

I wonder if you are aware of the 1/x hybrid concept car from Toyota. This will really make a difference. This site links to it:
http://www.sugre.info/Vorlage.phtml?id=589&sprache=en

cheers

Efried

uriel8
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Re: Prius - The Next Generation

A Gasless Future

fullscreen = http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5gbG9VbhDk

uriel8
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Re: Prius - The Next Generation

Not just another concept car- Toyota 1/X
Seems that Toyota makes everything right. Understanding that the vehicle mass dominates the fuel economy they have multiplied the Prius mass by the factor 1/3. For that weight the internal combustion engine is far to big - another 1/x cut having 500ccm displacement of course supported by the huge torque of the electric motor. What comes out is a really outstanding vehicle, the 1/X. Leaves only the wish that cost and energy efficient production of the carbon composites will enable mass production. Then we all will love the 90 MPG which equals 2.6l/100km gasoline, not diesel- another 1/x of today's figures.
source edmunds

That sounds like what I heard, E: the Prius almost tips the scales at 3,000 lbs or a ton and a half. What it needed was no ICE or like a 7 lb. lawnmower engine to charge some serious Li batteries in case you cannot find a plug in Fresno... at least 5 to 10x the current battery amp hour rating. The electric motor is already 97 horses which is almost enough for a lighter version. Of course, Toyota will comply because it makes some sense which is exciting. 8)

Detroit will lumber along with Mr. Waggoner and the rest of the goldbricks because their philosophy was "small cars--small profits". Try $4.00 gas, guys.

LinkOfHyrule
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Re: Prius - The Next Generation

I LOLed at the farting cows!

What's this about Apple having finance problems? Mua, ha, ha!

The author of this post isn't responsible for any injury, disability or dismemberment, death, financial loss, illness, addiction, hereditary disease, or any other undesirable consequence or general misfortune resulting from use of the "information" contai

DWrath
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Re: Prius - The Next Generation

From Consumer Reports online January 19, 2008:

Toyota jumps ahead in battery development

No sooner did Congress mandate dramatically higher fuel economy standards by 2020, than Toyota quickly threw down a second challenge to Detroit. Toyota President Katsuaki Watanabe announced that Toyota will raise its fleet average fuel economy to 35 mpg before the 2020 deadline. The company is attempting to keep the lead in the public perception of fuel efficiency. (Read the results of Consumer Reports' Brand Perceptions Survey.)

In addition, the company announced that it will begin producing its own lithium-ion batteries for plug-in hybrid vehicles through its joint venture with Panasonic. This is a key breakthrough, and it may put Toyota ahead in the race to produce plug-in hybrid vehicles. Plug-in hybrids can drive for short distances on electricity only, without starting their gasoline or diesel engines. If the batteries are large enough, they could allow people to drive all week without using gasoline, since 78 percent of Americans drive less than 27 miles a day. Conversion companies and universities have been modifying the current Prius to a plug-in for some time.

Today, automakers say there are no commercially available batteries with enough capacity to power plug-in hybrids. Most automakers agree that getting enough battery capacity on-board a car, without making the car too heavy or taking up too much space, will require lithium-ion batteries, rather than the nickel-metal-hydride batteries currently used in hybrids. Other automakers are working with suppliers to develop them and buying custom-made individual batteries for their demonstration vehicles.

While U.S. automakers and technology companies are still looking for breakthroughs in lithium-ion batteries, Toyota looks set to have batteries available for plug-in hybrids commercially available by 2010. Like General Motors (see "GM invests in cellulosic ethanol"), Toyota may position itself to be both an automaker client and a supplier for the next-generation energy technology, expanding its profit potential and competitive advantage.

Every major manufacturer is working on advanced automotive technologies, and it appears that for the foreseeable future, a reduction in gasoline consumption on the national level will come from a variety of energy and powertrain strategies.

—Eric Evarts

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