Hi all

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Wilfy
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Hi all
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Hello Everyone
Firstly can I say what a great little community you have going here and very much to my liking!!

I am a relative newbie to Electric Vehicles but I have the bug in a big way,currently I have just purchased a nearly new EVT 168 Scooter.It is completely standard and has really low mileage,being from the UK I was wondering if you have many members on here like me and also if anyone has the same Scooter if they have any views or do's and dont's before I get to blase about it.

I do know its very heavy and was wondering what sort of mileage I can expect out of it,I am over the average chinese mans weight of 75kg at about 105kg and the terrain near me is pretty flat(no I havent even tested it on the road yet until the better weather gets here).
I work approximately 8.5 miles away from my house,what do you reckon I would get there and back on 1 charge or am I pushing my luck?

Thanks in advance
Ian

Wilfy
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Re: Hi all

Does anyone also know the motor / scooter current specifications for I am trying to source lighter weight batteries for it to increase its range/decrease its weight.
I have looked at the LifeP04 48v 30ah batteries.How many of these would I need to replace my 4 x 12v 50ah Lead Acid batteries please?
Thanks

Electric EVT 168 48v Standard Setup(at present)

reikiman
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Re: Hi all

I wrote up an information page a long time ago that should help you understand the math involved. It's real simple. Electrical Basics covering batteries in electric vehicles

Basically you have a 48v50ah pack and two 48v30ah packs would be 48v60ah.

Another measure to look at is the kilowatt-hours per unit of weight, and kilowatt-hours per unit of size. Those are two measures of energy density. The reason lithium batteries are desirable is they tend to carry 4x the energy density of lead-acid batteries (by weight).

Crusher300
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Re: Hi all

I work approximately 8.5 miles away from my house,what do you reckon I would get there and back on 1 charge or am I pushing my luck?

17 miles round trip might work, depending on terrain and number of stops. It would be better to bring the charger and plug in at work. That way you don't discharge your batteries so deeply and they will last longer. Also look into some battery equalizers such as PowerCheqs. They also makes the batteries last longer.

As for Lithium, I'd wait until your current batteries die in a couple of years, by then there should be some readily available commercial solutions.

-Crusher300
Silver EVT 4000e (60 volt) San Mateo, CA

-Crusher300
Silver EVT 4000e (60 volt) San Mateo, CA

PJD
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Re: Hi all

It's difficult to compare LiFeP04 with lead acid. The standard ampere-hour (AH) rating of a lead acid battery represents the energy you can get out of it if discharged at a 20 hour rate at a rather balmy temperature of 25C - this is denoted "C/20". But, 50 ampere-hour AGM lead acid may run 50 hours at 1 amp, but it cannot run 1 hour at 50 amps (1C) - you could actually run it only about 40 minutes for a total of 33 amp hours. This is due to the nature of chemical reactions, and is called the Peukert effect.

Now, as far as LiFePO4 batteries - there doesn't seem to be a set standard discharge rate for the batteries quoted AH rating, but it is usually at a higher rate than lead acid - at least C/5. Better yet, LiFePO4 reportedly have a very low Peukerts effect. Some e-bikers have reported getting at least 99% of the full ampere-hour rating in hard e-bike use.

So, no guarantees or anything, but, when you also consider the added benefits of lighter weight, you _should_ be able to get the same range, from the 30AH LiFePO4's as the 50AH lead acid pack.

And, if your questions was how many individual cells are needed to equal a 4-12V battery pack, the answer is 15 or 16 cells - most seem to be using 16 cells.

Wilfy
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Re: Hi all

Excellent and thanks everyone for their comments,I am all ears at present and trying to learn such a fun and evergrowing hobby of mine.
What I meant by the LifeP04 battery packs to replace them is this.At present I have 4 x 12v batteries in series making my 48v,however I am presuming I can get this as 1 x 48v 30Ah battery,is this 1 battery that I will get replace all 4 of my Lead Acid batteries(I know the Ah on paper will be less by 20Ah) or is there something else I am missing?
Thanks
Ian

Electric EVT 168 48v Standard Setup(at present)

PJD
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Re: Hi all

Ian,

All the LiFePO4 packs I'm familiar with consist of a collection of single 3.2 volt cells combined with a battery management unit which balances the charging and discharging of the cells and provides over discharge and temperature protection. One exception is Valence, and possibly soon others, which make LiFePO4 batteries that mimic some common 12-volt battery sizes - including those used in EVT scooters.

Most e-scooters have their batteries arranged in very specific configuration, so I doubt the separate batteries could be replaced with one big battery unless it was a custom one of a very odd shape. Valence U1 cells could be used in the EVT scooters, but last I checked, four of them were about $3,500 US.

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