How much can I get from ....?

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longtong3
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Last seen: 13 years 2 months ago
Joined: Monday, January 28, 2008 - 21:39
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How much can I get from ....?

#1- 180 VDC 3,100 RPM PM MOTOR
Power 1.5 HP
Voltage 180 VDC
Amperage 7.6 Amps
Speed 3,100 RPM
Rotation reversible
Enclosure open
Duty treadmill (2-4 hours @ full load)

#2- HP 2-1/2 at 130 VDC int.
1-1/2 at 95 VDC cont.
95-130 VDC
18.5 Amps
0-6750 RPM
Rotation reversible

#3- 2.0 Hp
130 VDC
Draws 15 Amps
3,210 RPM
Continuous duty
OFC enclosure
Reversible rotation

If I connect either 1 of 3 motors above direct to my bicycle wheel shaft, wheel turn once, motor turn once for excercise at home.

Is there any formula or any simple way to calculate how many volts, ampere or watt I can get if I pedal the wheel at 200 rpm or at 600 rpm ? Is the motor get hot at these speed?

If I charge 12 volts battery, how many rpm do I need?

Thanks.

LinkOfHyrule
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Last seen: 11 years 10 months ago
Joined: Wednesday, October 17, 2007 - 14:54
Points: 730
Re: How much can I get from ....?

I'll work on number three:

3210 / 130 = ~ 25RPM/V

300RPM / 25V = 12V

So, you're gonna need 300RPM to reach 12V (little more to charge the batt) theoretically.

Amps (and therefore wattage) will be determined by the load. You can easily get 12V open circuit, but the amount of torque you have to put into the motor will depend on how many amps you're trying to take out. That can be calculated if you know the motors NM/Amp rating (actually, it can be done from the info you've given but I don't want to work it out right now).

In any case, these are approximations. Various losses have to be accounted for, too.

The author of this post isn't responsible for any injury, disability or dismemberment, death, financial loss, illness, addiction, hereditary disease, or any other undesirable consequence or general misfortune resulting from use of the "information" contai

longtong3
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Last seen: 13 years 2 months ago
Joined: Monday, January 28, 2008 - 21:39
Points: 3
Re: How much can I get from ....?

I'll work on number three:

3210 / 130 = ~ 25RPM/V

300RPM / 25V = 12V

So, you're gonna need 300RPM to reach 12V (little more to charge the batt) theoretically.

Amps (and therefore wattage) will be determined by the load. You can easily get 12V open circuit, but the amount of torque you have to put into the motor will depend on how many amps you're trying to take out. That can be calculated if you know the motors NM/Amp rating (actually, it can be done from the info you've given but I don't want to work it out right now).

In any case, these are approximations. Various losses have to be accounted for, too.

Thanks for reply.

The 25 RPM/V, is that good guideline for choosing the motor? Higher number like 35 RPM/V and 15 RPM/V, which one should I choose and why?

When you have time, pls do your calculating so I can learn from you.

I had a generator head from the old gas engine, broken now, the head still ok.Its rating 3600 RPM, 120/240 Volts, 7200 W,if I run this generator at 400 rpm, that is 1/9 its rating speed, so I get 1/9 its voltage & watt is 13/26 V/ 800W. Which voltage should I rectified, 13 or 26 V to charge my 12 volts battery? Does my calculate correct? I run at lower RPM like this, will it damage the generator or equipment?

If I have the load, I have to work harder on the pedal even that I have the same voltage coming out, correct?

Thanks.

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