Solar Charging

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Luke
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Joined: 03/19/2008
Points: 13

This is what I have:

x5303 rear hub motor on 26" MTB
36-72v crystalyte controller
12, 18ah sla batteries wired for 72v @ 36ah.

The question:

Can I hookup a small ( maybe 10w or so ) 12v ( or less ) solar panel to the 72v system ? This way when I am at work and the bike is outside the panel can slowly charge the batteries? I know it will not charge it up much but the question is will it work with out damaging the batteries ? I live in Arizona and the bike should get a solid 6 hours of sun.

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ArcticFox
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Joined: 06/12/2007
Points: 1091
Re: Solar Charging

I would say, "No, that will not work."

Have you seen this:

Don1.jpg
Don2.jpg

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2005/04/don_dunkees_diy.php

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dogman
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Points: 830
Re: Solar Charging

My pack, a 36 v 20 ah ping, using 3 10 watt panels would charge in a mere 75 hours. We get lots of sun in NM, 6 hours a day sooo 12.5 days to charge. Maybe only 6 days if you stood there and tracked the sun perfectly. What it takes is about 200 watts and a charge controller, then you charge at night, off a battery you charged all day. But hey, if the little panel gets conversations started with chicks, its worth it for sure.

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reikiman
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Points: 8444
Re: Solar Charging

Yeah, that was an EVT 4000 and was discussed on the old V (V.com) years back, that guy even made a few postings on the old V. It took that bike three days to charge from a full ride. Not very practical. Cool, though.

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Luke
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Joined: 03/19/2008
Points: 13
Re: Solar Charging

ok fair enough lol. No solar panel for me. I did however rewire the batteries for 48v. I dont really need to go over 25 - 30 mph the whole way. @ 48v I top out at a little over 35 mph any how. @ 36ah I can do my 30 mile commute ( round trip ) and at the 54ah there will never be a question. I would like to go back to 72v however I just don't have a charging solution yet. ( And i hate rewiring everything, every time ) Any suggestions ? I was thinking about wiring two 36v chargers for the 72v. Or can i just use my 48v charger and it will just take longer? ( not exacally sure how it all works ) The bike can charge for a maximum of 12 hours, what do you think is the best way ?

reikiman
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Re: Solar Charging

One way I think solar charging could be done is this:-

Set up a bank of batteries at your house .. and install a set of solar panels that charge those batteries.

There's some details to ponder such as the voltage of the stationary batteries and the technology between those batteries and the pack on your vehicle. A simple way is to have the stationary batteries at 12v nominal (13.2v when fully charged) and use an inverter to derive 120vAC and use the normal charger driven off that 120v. There's some lossage but it keeps you from inventing a 12v charging system.

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Mik
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Joined: 12/11/2007
Points: 3739
Re: Solar Charging

reikiman wrote:

One way I think solar charging could be done is this:-

Set up a bank of batteries at your house .. and install a set of solar panels that charge those batteries.

There's some details to ponder such as the voltage of the stationary batteries and the technology between those batteries and the pack on your vehicle. A simple way is to have the stationary batteries at 12v nominal (13.2v when fully charged) and use an inverter to derive 120vAC and use the normal charger driven off that 120v. There's some lossage but it keeps you from inventing a 12v charging system.

I believe for most people it would much more efficient to produce pholtovoltaic electricity and feed it straight into the grid. That way it is feasible to produce sufficient electricity to offset the amount needed for EV use.

Here is an interesting development re: solar panels:
http://www.nanosolar.com/blog3

Mr. Mik

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