etek

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echuckj5
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etek

Questions,

I really hope to get some help here,

POWER: 24-48 VDC BRUSHLESS MOTOR. NEW ADVANCED BRUSHLESS DESIGN of the DISCONTINUED B&S ETEK motor. Now back in production. 15HP peak, 6HP cont. 90% EFFICIENCY for much longer battery life. BRUSHLESS DESIGN = 0 maintenance.
This motor has a built-in cooling fan set for a CCW direction, but can be run CW with optional fan. Motor weight is 22 pounds.
This motor is a direct replacement for the Etek (Briggs & Stratton) brushed DC motor. Highest power to weight ratio of any PM motor technology.
Commutation is accomplished with an internal Hall Cell assembly, connected to the 6-pin external wire harness.
Output Power, Torque and RPM:
Voltage Constant: 70 RPM/VDC. Torque Constant: 1.20" lbs/amp. Max Motor Current: 300 A/1min. Weight: 22 Lbs. Dia. 8". Output: 15HP Max. 6HP Cont. Voltage: 24-48 VDC.
This is a Brushless motor and requires a 3 Phase 8 Pole control to operate the motor

Which way is counter clockwise rotation?

Where in the world does one get a 3 phase 8 pole controller to operate this motor?

Serious Replies only, well, I guess I should have asked for that somewhere else, any reply will do.

chuck

Fechter
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Re: etek

It's really just a regular brushless controller. The guys at Thunderstruck Motors have them. Sevcon makes one also. If you face the shaft, it turns counterclockwise. The rotation can be reversed with most brusheless controllers.

echuckj5
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Re: etek

The sevcon controller is for 36 volts max,"

This is the perfect mate to our brushless “Etek” motor, above. It operates at 24-36V and includes a ton of safety settings.
Here are the specifications:
24-36V input
250 amp continuous rating
Torque or RPM mode servo operation
93% efficient
4000 RPM max commutation speed
Weight: 6.5 lbs. (shipping weight 8 lbs.)

You need to know that this is a microprocessor based controller. So there are a bunch of settings that control various elements of its operation. In the “Supporting Documents” section you will find the reference manual from SEVCON as well as a document that I created, containing all the important settings that I need to put into place before I ship it to you. These are done with a special handheld tool from SEVCON, called a “calibrator.” It’s about the size of a DVM and basically a dumb user interface to the internal menu system in the controller. I bought mine on eBay though you can also order them straight from SEVCON. (In the future I hope to offer a couple to loan out.)

Please note: This is not a 48V controller.

chuck

[b]AGM BATTERIES[/b]

echuckj5
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Re: etek for a El Chopper ET, brushless

From the sevcon site I see only 2 controllers for the etek brushless

a 250 amp for up to 36 volts

a 200 amp for 36 to 48 volts

4 quadrant must be reverse capability, from what I gather

Both would be just marginal for the Etek brushless with up to 15 peak hp, the controllers just will cover 12 hp.

I have always been against letting the smoke out of things.

I guess I'll have to do some calculations, see how much power I'll use, some steep hills around here, hoping for a cruising speed of about 40 mph, top speed on the flat
of 50 mph, 35 mph max range, a 20 mile standard range

250 RCM185.jpg

Here are the specifications:
24-36V input
250 amp continuous rating
Torque or RPM mode servo operation
93% efficient
(Qoute)
"You need to know that this is a microprocessor based controller. So there are a bunch of settings that control various elements of its operation. In the “Supporting Documents” section you will find the reference manual from SEVCON as well as a document that I created, containing all the important settings that I need to put into place before I ship it to you. These are done with a special handheld tool from SEVCON, called a “calibrator.” It’s about the size of a DVM and basically a dumb user interface to the internal menu system in the controller."

It's about the same for the 48 volt 200 amp sevcon controller

chuck

[b]AGM BATTERIES[/b]

MB-1-E
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Re: etek for a El Chopper ET, brushless

Hey Chuck,

I believe an AllTrax controller is used on the Jackal which uses an Etek (or Etek like motor).
http://www.thunderstruck-ev.com/Alltrax.htm
... or maybe this is some old information.
It's worth checking out, they definately make a high quality product.

Dave

MB-1-E
Electric - Bridgestone MB-1 Mountain Bike

Dave B

MB-1-E
<a href="http://visforvoltage.org/book-page/996-mountain-bike-conversion-24v-3-4h... - Bridgestone MB-1 Mountain Bike</a>

echuckj5
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Re: etek for a El Chopper ET, brushless

Your right Dave,

Etek Brushed is discontinued and the new Etek is brushless. Briggs and Stratton says that the brushless is a direct replacement for the brushed version. What I have found for the controllers for the brushless at 48 volts have a continuous rating of 200 amps. I have some long grades in my area, in the 2 to 3 degree range, one is 2 and a half miles long and traffic flows at about 40 to 45 mph on this stretch. I am calculating that on a daily drive that this will probably be a little past the limit for the controller, considering the extremely hot temperatures we get down here in the summer.

Other motor alternatives are the pmg motors, but, their rpm per volt is higher, meaning more gear reduction. Or, I use the Advanced DC motors. Problem with the Advanced motors is that I would have very little adjustment room and not many belt and sprocket combinations will work for them, limiting my gearing choices because of the fewer centering options available.

I still have not decided definatively on the Bidwell Rebel conversion. The Bidwell Ninja looks good also, it is a larger motorcycle, but, being based on a 1987 model bike has it's drawbacks. Tires are hard to come by, it uses some odd sizes, body parts are becoming obsolete, not many out there for parts, the Ninja has always been a very highly regarded bike and has a steel frame that really appeals to me.

chuck

[b]AGM BATTERIES[/b]

jdh2550_1
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Re: etek for a El Chopper ET, brushless

I just (today) scored a promise of a free mid 70's CB750 Four from a friend at work (it's been sitting un-ridden for several years).

I'm going to use Bidwell's book "Secrets of El Ninja" and attempt to convert the 750 to electric. I'm also in the process of choosing between PMG and ETek.

Are you thinking of incorporating re-gen braking into your design?

John H.
Blue XM-2000
Ann Arbor, MI
http://www.revevllc.com

John H. Founder of Current Motor Company - opinions on this site belong to me; not to my employer
Remember: " 'lectric for local. diesel for distance" - JTH, Amp Bros || "No Gas.

echuckj5
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Re: etek for a El Chopper ET, brushless

John,

The regen braking, if my controller supports it, it would be worth a try. My experience with the Cheetah is, 6 mile trip, 17 stops. 50 feet a stop. Thats 850 feet of potential to put back into the battery if regen was 100% effective. that would be about 2% gain in distance. Slow down a mile an hour would probably give more than that.

Looked again at the pmg 132. I had wrote down the rpm per volt of the pmg 80. The pmg 132 looks a lot more promising than the new brushless etek. The pmg 132 says 86% efficient at 48 volts, has the ability to run at 72 volts, a lower rpm per volt than the brushless etek. Overall about $400 more than the etek.

That volt per rpm is very appealing, a lot more sprocket combinations are possible, I will be using a belt drive, with the lower rpm and the speeds I want to operate at give me the option to use an 8mm gates pg2 belt, or the new gates polychain? belt, both more efficient than any chain, virtually silent, no oiling, very little adjustment and very long life.

For $400 more the pmg 132 is looking better and better.

The old 750 Honda, I had more than 1. Very durable, one thing I never liked about them was the narrow handlebars and the chain whirred like an airliner out on the road. Windshield never worked well on them. The distance from my head to the windshield was always wrong, right in the buffeting area, had to hold my head way back or tuck in to stop it. I remember I found a very small windshield that worked decent, did'nt stop the rain but helped my neck on long trips. But, alas, I guess going electric these concerns are not to important. Upgrade the front brakes, the factory brakes were a little weak compared to others, I also remember that the front springs were soft, I know others who replaced them with progressives. They swore by them.

Lets see here, how do I get those gizmos to work

:?

chuck

[b]AGM BATTERIES[/b]

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