Electric Scooters

electricrevolution's picture

Electric Revolution in the UK

Join the Electric Revolution......How far has the electric revolution really come? Lets start simple with an electric scooter which is now a viable product in the UK. How many charging points are there now in London? Are the bus lanes fully open for use to scooters classed as L1 mopeds which are limited to 30 mph? Why is there 6% import duty on electric scooters? Government assistance please for purchase of electric scooters.

www.electricrevolution.co.uk

Need help creating an electric scooter

OK, here it goes.

I have a Diggler mountain scooter and a large electric motor (told it was a showscan projector motor). My goal is to build a daily commuter to get to and from work (been a fantasy of mine for 5 yrs, now I want to make it a reality). I ran into a guy who was riding one about 17 miles to work (SF bay area). Anywho, I stopped the guy and he said his friend put together a kit for $700 and he said he could go 40mph and could travel 20-25 miles between charge, this scooter had a hub motor and is way out of my price range. I've spent $100 so far for the scooter and the motor was free, quality parts are important but would really like to keep the costs down as much as poss. I checked online for any hub motors but no luck.

Questions that I have:
1. does this sound like it can be done using the motor that I currently have?
2. due to me not currently having a hub motor and this being a scooter means no rear sprocket, does this mean I have to go with a direct drive spindle system to use this motor? The stock wheel axles are a bit narrower then a standard bmx rear wheel so it doesn't fit between the drop outs, I might be able to widen the rear drop outs somehow but don't want to damage the frame integrity.

Pics of the bike and the motor are at the bottom of this string (motor is just placed on the deck for reference).

Diggler dimentions:
20" BMX wheels with no rear sprocket or freewheel (which I will put road tires on)
front shocks with 2" travel
have v brakes f/r (will get disk brakes cause it will travel 30-40 mph)
I'll go the the electronics store down the street to confirm what the motor draws but here are the motor details on the casing itself:

AMETEK DYNAMICS DIV
P/N 0842-11 SN-001
D.C. VOLTS 28

The motor dimensions are:
L= 4 1/2" (including 4 hole flange)
Diameter of casing= 4 1/8"
4 x bolt holes are 3 3/8" apart from each other
Shaft is 6" long (end to end) and
the motor has one black lead (17 1/2") and one white lead (15 1/2")

I'm having a hard time finding any info at all on this motor but am going to continue looking, if anyone know anything about this motor please let me know.

I found a couple examples of DIY electric digglers which have links included in this string. Whenever anyone has some time please help point me in the right direction, whether it be good books to read on building your own e-scooter or someone who wouldn't mind chatting on the phone. Anything would help since I'm not the best with figuring out electricity (volts, Amps and anything related to electric vehicles).

Thanks
Russ

IMG_0187.jpg
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IMG_0194.jpg
IMG_0195.jpg

Need help creating an electric scooter

OK, here it goes.

I have a Diggler mountain scooter and a large electric motor (told it was a showscan projector motor). My goal is to build a daily commuter to get to and from work (been a fantasy of mine for 5 yrs, now I want to make it a reality). I ran into a guy who was riding one about 17 miles to work (SF bay area). Anywho, I stopped the guy and he said his friend put together a kit for $700 and he said he could go 40mph and could travel 20-25 miles between charge, this scooter had a hub motor and is way out of my price range. I've spent $100 so far for the scooter and the motor was free, quality parts are important but would really like to keep the costs down as much as poss. I checked online for any hub motors but no luck.

Questions that I have:
1. does this sound like it can be done using the motor that I currently have?
2. due to me not currently having a hub motor and this being a scooter means no rear sprocket, does this mean I have to go with a direct drive spindle system to use this motor? The stock wheel axles are a bit narrower then a standard bmx rear wheel so it doesn't fit between the drop outs, I might be able to widen the rear drop outs somehow but don't want to damage the frame integrity.

Pics of the bike and the motor are at the bottom of this string (motor is just placed on the deck for reference).

Diggler dimentions:
20" BMX wheels with no rear sprocket or freewheel (which I will put road tires on)
front shocks with 2" travel
have v brakes f/r (will get disk brakes cause it will travel 30-40 mph)
I'll go the the electronics store down the street to confirm what the motor draws but here are the motor details on the casing itself:

AMETEK DYNAMICS DIV
P/N 0842-11 SN-001
D.C. VOLTS 28

The motor dimensions are:
L= 4 1/2" (including 4 hole flange)
Diameter of casing= 4 1/8"
4 x bolt holes are 3 3/8" apart from each other
Shaft is 6" long (end to end) and
the motor has one black lead (17 1/2") and one white lead (15 1/2")

I'm having a hard time finding any info at all on this motor but am going to continue looking, if anyone know anything about this motor please let me know.

I found a couple examples of DIY electric digglers which have links included in this string. Whenever anyone has some time please help point me in the right direction, whether it be good books to read on building your own e-scooter or someone who wouldn't mind chatting on the phone. Anything would help since I'm not the best with figuring out electricity (volts, Amps and anything related to electric vehicles).

Thanks
Russ

IMG_0187.jpg
IMG_0188.jpg
IMG_0190.jpg
IMG_0191.jpg
IMG_0192.jpg
IMG_0193.jpg
IMG_0194.jpg
IMG_0195.jpg

jstept's picture

Fire is bad.

I had a harrowing experience yesterday while I was riding the Rezistor home from work. I smelled something funny (it always starts that way, doesn't it?), looked down, and saw smoke coming out from under the seat. I pulled over, cut the power, got off, and saw the paint on the exterior catch fire. I blew out the fire, lifted the seat, and saw some arcing between the corner of the battery pack and the inside of the scooter body. I disconnected the battery pack immediately.

jstept's picture

The Rezistor - still works...

Rode the Rezistor to work yesterday and today. I haven't been able to find any electrical outlets on the outside of the (very old) building I work in, so I had to improvise.

workcharge_1.jpg
workcharge_2.jpg
workcharge_3.jpg

jstept's picture

The Rezistor - World's Quietest Vespa

This weekend I rode the Rezistor to Spring Scoot, a scooter rally held annually each year here in Portland. It basically served as the initial test run and range tests. I started with a 6.6 mile ride on Friday night and rode progressively longer distances Saturday and Sunday. I finished with a 14.5 mile ride Sunday evening, much of it at full throttle. There seemed to be juice left when I got home, although my headlight (and presumably the rest of my accessories) seems to have given out a few blocks earlier. The controller, motor, and power cables were only a little warm.

jstept's picture

The Rezistor - preparing for road tests

The replacement controller from Team Delta arrived on Wednesday. Fantastic service from Dan, considering I just explained the problem to him on Sunday. I installed it and, at first, got the same "MOSFET short circuit" error message from the controller as before. I wondered if the contactor might be faulty, so I took that out, fiddled with it as much as I could (which wasn't much) then reinstalled it. But then it occured to me that the 12V converter might be faulty, so I left that disconnected. That must have been it, because the scooter worked after that.

jstept's picture

The Rezistor - Final Assembly and Testing

Well, it's been an exciting week. I spent much of last Saturday getting the brakes working, installing the levers, cables, and switches. The brakelight switches install in-line in the brake cables within the headset, so I had to figure out where to cut the cable housings to get them in the right spot.
headset_attachment.jpgbrake_switches.jpg

jstept's picture

The Rezistor - building the drivetrain

HUGE thanks to my friend Arden for helping me assemble the drivetrain. A fellow member of the Oregon Scooter Club, Arden has an amazing shop with machining and welding capabilities. He probably saved me over $100 in machine shop costs, as well as providing some of the raw materials.

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